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Dispel the most popular myths about the dangers of microwaves

Dispel the most popular myths about the dangers of microwaves. These articles do crop up very often. This is quite good although I have had to go through and edit it a bit.

Today they can be found in 95% of households, and we have become accustomed to warming up, reheating or cooking almost any meal without needing the oven or hob. It is convenient, however, there are some myths that just keep bouncing around about how harmful microwave ovens are. Lets dispel those here and now. We've been selling and repairing microwave ovens for over 30 years so we have some experience in their design and use.


How does a microwave work ?


Every microwave oven has a generator of electromagnetic waves called a magnetron. These micro waves cause water or liquid molecules in the oven to oscillate or vibrate, the resulting friction of the molecules against each other produces heat, which is enough to raise the temperature, much the same as rubbing your hands together will make them warm. The most common conductors of this heat are water, fat and sugar. One or more of these are contained in almost everything we want to cook which makes the microwave oven so useful.


Myth 1. Dangerous radiation

Despite the fact that the word "radiation” conjures up dread for many people, the radiation used in the microwave is non ionising radiation, the only thing it can do is cause polarized molecules to vibrate, and as a result produce heat. It is no different to radio and mobile phone signals and despite the myths surrounding those - (a different subject), microwaves are contained inside the oven cavity. It is different from radioactive radiation, which leads to the disintegration of molecules and atoms. Microwave radiation also leaves the structure of the molecules unchanged, so it is quite safe.


Myth 2. You cannot be near a working microwave

Microwave radiation has poor penetrating power and are easily shielded by metal. That is why the walls of microwave ovens are usually made of metal. In this situation the main source of "microwave leakage” is around the door of the microwave oven, so it makes sense to ensure that it is securely closed. For this reason all microwave ovens automatically turn off when the door is opened and cant be started unless the door is latched closed so that the risk of exposure is minimal.


Microwave leakage from an intact microwave oven is so small that it would almost be impossible to measure. We, as microwave technicians check for leakage after every repair. Microwave ovens have so many safety devices that we rarely find any leakage unless there is an obvious fault on the oven. Customers concerns are more often based around other aspects of the running microwave, electrical noise created by the components inside, steam or condensation being produced by the food cooking or general mechanical rattles and noises.

Myth 3. Microwaves damages the food

The only thing a microwave can do with food is to heat it. Therefore, the only changes that can occur are associated with the processes occurring during heating of food. When you use the microwave, they are no different from those that occur when cooking or frying.

It is known that heat treatment reduces the content of vitamins and other nutrients: fresh fruits and vegetables healthier than cooked. However, the microwave has a small advantage because the food in it is cooked faster and vitamins are retained better. Studies have shown that when cooking in a microwave oven better retains most water-soluble vitamins (such as B1, B2, folic acid). This is because in microwave the food is cooked "dry”, without immersion in boiling water which "washes out” some of the vitamins.

There is no reason to think that using a microwave can harm you. However, it makes sense to remember a few simple precautions that will help you safely use your microwave.

Precautions

Do not use cheap plastic containers that are not designed for microwave use ( chinese takeaway or butter tubs). When heated, they may release harmful substances (such as BPA's). It is best to use microwave safe specific containers or glass (pyrex).

Be careful. The food or drink you are heating will get hot. Thats what you want it to do. Expect to need oven gloves if you have been cooking for a while. The microwave itself produces a lot of heat so may well become very hot to the touch.

Created On  30 May 2017 16:59  -  Permalink
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Guest Check out now available

We have just added the option of Guest checkout to our checkout pages. This requires our customers to enter the minimum amount of information to place an order. It will speed up the order process for kitchenwareonline customers by allowing an order to go through with just the delivery name and address and contact email required. if a customer is definitely only going to order once it may save some time. Certainly with full registration ( which only actually requires the addition of a password) we can retain your order history and deal with any issues arising from previous orders quicker. 


As it happens, to date, we haven't been able to make use of any customer data for marketing purposes anyway so there it was unlikely customers would be affected by spam mails from us although we have always had the option when registering not be kept up to date (put on a mailing list).

We hope of course that guest checkout will make Kitchenwareonline even quicker and easier to use for everyone.

Created On  15 May 2017 17:05  -  Permalink
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Charles Viancin silicone food covers

Created On  26 Apr 2017 14:01  -  Permalink
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Kitchenwareonline now SSL secure

We are pleased to announce that we now have an SSL certificate for Kitchenwareonline.com.



Although we already have a huge amount of security in place provided by Actinic who built and host our website, we have added to your peace of mind by adding an SSL certificate.



SSL stands for Secure Sockets Layer. This ensures that the link between your browser and our website on Actinics server is a secure connection, that the link between our information on the site and any information you see or enter is not compromised.



This is qualified when you visit our site by the annotation at the start of the address bar in green with a green padlock. Google is helping its customers (anyone who browses using google chrome) by showing whether a site is secure by showing this information at the start of every web address. - You can see this above now. Experts think that up to two thirds of websites currently do not have this SSL and therefore potentially not be as secure as they could be.

This is not quite the same as the certificates that websites show, that they are secure for taking payments. We have chosen not to try and invest in making the site secure enough to take payments. This is hugely complicated and expensive. Instead we use a payment gateway. This means that when you are ready to commit to make a payment for an order on our website you will be redirected to an extremely secure site (or payment gateway). In our case we use Sagepay. Sagepay in turn run all of the security checks and process your payment for us. They in turn pass you back to our shop and behind the scenes tell us that they have received your payment on our behalf and to go ahead and process your order. When you choose your payment method you can choose Sagepay or Paypal who of course have their own security methods, but again, process payments for us.

For us this is great because we don't have to worry about any of your payment details and the security aspect of storing those. We have nothing to do with your payment details, they are all dealt with by the payment gateway who in turn go to great lengths to keep your details secure.

We hope this brief explanation offers further confidence for our customers. We will continue to take advice from Actinic and from Google on the best way to offer the best service for all of our customers.

Created On  12 Apr 2017 10:16 in Technical and repair articles  -  Permalink
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A better way of finding spares for your appliance

We are just going through a re development on the site which will result in a faster, easier to navigate shop. We have, since we created www.kitchenwareonline.com listed all of the model numbers, but have effectively created a category for each model showing all of the items available for that model. In doing so we have created a huge site with lots of duplicate items to cater for the number of models that share particular items. We are now going through and removing these duplicates and instead, listing all the models that a particular part fits in its description. As work progresses we will encourage visitors looking for parts for a particular model to enter the model number of your appliance in the search box at the top of the page (every page). This will result in all products that are suitable for that model will be displayed. 

Shoppers can also browse by category such as microwave cookware or waveguide covers for example or you can search by brand such as Sharp. So far during testing we have found everything we have been looking for that we know is on there. We have hugely reduced the number of clicks required to get you to the part you need.

We hope that this work will be completed in the next 3 weeks but wont affect anything on the site currently.

Created On  24 Mar 2017 13:34  -  Permalink
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How to replace the microwave oven lamp (bulb)

How to replace the microwave lamp (bulb)


Note: In the interest of safety, please make sure your appliance is unplugged from the mains and that the area you are working in is safe. Also, please note the case has sharp edges, so be careful!


What's my model number?
This can be found by opening the door and viewing the information sticker located on the left hand side of the control panel. Alternatively your model number may be located on the back of the oven.

Removal process for old Microwaves

The older models had a flap on the left hand side of the case. You simply unscrew this and remove the flap. Replace the bulb and then replace the flap and tighten the screw up.
Simple

Removal process for newer Microwaves
Firstly, turn the machine around and you'll notice screws all round the case, remove these. There may be some screws on the side of the case, remove these to.
Pull the case towards you and remove. Depending on your model your lamp may be clearly visible on the left or right hand side. Many new models the bulb is hidden. To find this either look for the base of the bulb or turn the microwave so its facing you, now look directly behind the control panel it will be there. 
Remove the screw holding the lamp in/lift up the metal tabs holding the lamp in.
Remove the connector on the bulb
Pull out the lamp.
(Some models you must replace the lamp/bulb as they come as a complete unit, others you can unscrew the bulb from the holder)







microwave cabinet off



changing microwave oven bulb

Once you have removed the lamp you can see what design it is and then find a replacement. We have them listed in our shop either by design type or under the relevent make and model.

Fitting your new Lamp
Place the new lamp in the hole
Refit the scew/push down the metal tabs
Re-attach the power connector
Replace the case – You will need to slide the top in place, then the left hand side, then the right hand side. Replace all the screws and test your handy work out!
Created On  1 Mar 2017 10:00  -  Permalink
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